Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets.”

 

Assistance Dogs International (ADI), an international coalition of nonprofit assistance dog organizations, provides further clarification. According to ADI, there are three types of assistance dogs:

According to the 2010 Revised Requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, “Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities.

 

Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets.”

WHAT'S A SERVICE DOG?

  1. Guide dogs for the blind and visually impaired
     

  2. Hearing dogs for the deaf and hard of hearing
     

  3. Service Dogs – for people with disabilities other than those related to vision or hearing

 

Our service dogs for veterans with PTS learn many tasks that allow them to assist in medical and life-coping situations, and help the veteran cope with emotional overload.

 

Among the many tasks learned, these service dogs learn to “Block” (stand perpendicular to the veteran to add a sense of keeping other people at a distance from them; “Cover” (stand or sit rear facing at the veteran’s side to watch his back and lick or nudge when someone is approaching); and “Paws”( jump gently on the vet to provide deep pressure when anxiety is coming on).

These service dogs are also trained to diffuse the situation or redirect attention during a panic attack or emotional overload (e.g., the service dog is trained to vigorously lick a person's face to bring his partner to full awareness). 

WADE'S WARRIORS MEMORIAL FUND

Donations made to the Wade’s Warriors Memorial Fund will support the cost of screening, training, and graduating veteran/service dog pairs in the Service Dogs for Veterans Program at Paws 4 Liberty. To read more about Wade's story and support the cause, click the button below!

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